Quinquagesima Feb 23, 2020

Sermon by Canon Claude Schroeder

We come today to the final Sunday in this season of pre-Lent: Quinquagesima, from the Latin word tor 50, in anticipation of the 40 days of Lent which starts on Wednesday.

“Then Jesus took unto the 12 aside and said to them, “See ​we are going up to Jerusalem, and everythinq that is written about the Son of Man by the prophets will be accomplished.”

Lent is a journey with Jesus and his disciples to Jerusalem.

Continue reading “Quinquagesima Feb 23, 2020”

Becoming the Story We Tell: Lent 2020 Small Groups Program

Small groups will meet weekly to study the Gospel Lesson for the upcoming Sunday.  This year’s Lenten Gospel Lessons come from the Gospels of John and Matthew.  The readings from John’s Gospel (Lent 2-5) are all stories of an individual person having a life-changing encounter with Jesus.  How can we encounter Jesus in Regina in the 21st century?  How would an encounter with Jesus alter our lives?

                                                     Schedule:

Mondays @ 7:00 pmLeader: Carol M
Host: Lorna C
Wednesdays @ 9:00 amLeader: Claude S
Host: At St. Mary’s
Wednesdays @ 7:00 pmLeader: Henry F
Hosts: Alan and Jacky S
Saturdays @ 7:00 pmLeader: Katherine G
Host: Ginny L
Sundays @ 7:00 pmLeader and Host: Beth C

For families who are unable to make these dates and times work in your schedule, you are invited to sign up to be paired with another family to pray and study together at a time that is convenient for you.  Speak to Heidi D or Karen J to be added to this list and receive the materials.

A group is being organized for our older youth which will meet at St. Mary’s on Friday evenings.  Speak to Nathaniel for details.

February 23th, 2020 – Quinquagesima Sunday

O LORD, who hast taught us that all our doings without charity are nothing worth: Send thy Holy Spirit, and pour into our hearts that most excellent gift of charity, the very bond of peace and of all virtues, without which whosoever lives is counted dead before thee: Grant this for thine only Son Jesus Christ’s sake.  Amen.

Isaiah 35:3-7; Psalm 2; 1 Corinthians 13:1-13; Luke 18:31-43

The Lenten season is meant to kindle a “bright sadness” within our hearts. Its aim is precisely the remembrance of Christ, a longing for a relationship with God that has been lost. Lent offers the time and place for recovery of this relationship. The darkness of Lent allows the flame of the Holy Spirit to burn within our hearts until we are led to the brilliance of the Resurrection. (Alexander Schmemann)

BRETHREN, in the primitive Church it was the custom to observe with great devotion the days of our Lord’s Passion and Resurrection, and to prepare for the same by a season of penitence and fasting. This season of Lent provided also a time in which converts to the faith were prepared for holy Baptism. It was also a time when such persons as had, by reason of notorious sins, been separated from the body of the faithful, were reconciled and restored to the fellowship of the Church by penitence and forgiveness. Thereby the whole Congregation was put in mind of the message of pardon and absolution contained in the Gospel of our Saviour, and of the need which all Christians continually have, of a renewal of their repentance and faith. I therefore invite you, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance, by prayer, fasting, and self-denial, and by reading and meditation upon God’s holy Word. (Book of Common Prayer p. 611)

This week’s sermon

February 2, 2020 – The Presentation of Christ in the Temple/The Purification of St. Mary the Virgin

ALMIGHTY and everliving God, we humbly  beseech thy Majesty, that, as thy only-be- gotten Son was this day presented in the temple  in substance of our flesh, so we may be presented  unto thee with pure and clean hearts, by the same  thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Malachi 3:1-5; Psalm 24:7-10; Hebrews 2:14-18; Luke 2:22-40

January 26th, 2020 – Third Sunday after Epiphany

Almighty and everlasting God, mercifully look upon our infirmities, and in all our dangers and necessities stretch forth thy right hand to help and defend us; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Isaiah 9:1-4; Psalm 27:1, 5-13; 1 Corinthians 1:10-18; Matthew 4:12-23

In our reading from Isaiah today we find a promise and prophecy concerning God’s intention to restore His people to freedom and joy, and locates this activity in an unlikely place: Galilee. In today’s Gospel lesson, Matthew references this prophecy as finding its fulfillment in the public ministry of Jesus, which comprised of making disciples, preaching, teaching, and healing. Our Psalm puts language to our souls’
longing for God, and the experience of His salvation. In our Epistle reading today, Paul appeals for unity within the Church that is divided by various factions, and in reflecting on his ministry of word and sacrament among the Corinthians, stresses, after the example of Jesus, the saving power of the Gospel and the priority he gave its proclamation in his own ministry.

St. Mary’s Book Club (Feb 2020)

The next meeting of the St. Mary’s Book Club will be on Wednesday, February 19th starting at 7:00 pm.  Location is Beth C’s home.  This month we will be reading The Supper of the Lamb: A Culinary Reflection by Robert Farrar Capon. 

Book description:

 “From a passionate and talented chef who also happens to be an Episcopalian priest comes this surprising and thought-provoking treatise on everything from prayer to poetry to puff pastry. In The Supper of the Lamb, Capon talks about festal and ferial cooking, emerging as an inspirational voice extolling the benefits and wonders of old-fashioned home cooking in a world of fast food and prepackaged cuisine.”

The Ideas Salon

Saturday, January 25th.  Family Dinner and a Movie.  Next Saturday, starting at 5:00 pm, we will be having a salads pot luck and showing the film “Summer in the Forest,” the story of Jean Vanier and the L’Arche community in France.  Salad greens and breads will be provided; bring salad toppings to share.  Be creative!  Ideas we are exploring: How do we use food to foster human community?  How should Christians invite society’s outsiders into the community we are building (a.k.a. The Church)?  All are welcome!

January 19th, 2020 – The Second Sunday after Epiphany

Almighty and everlasting God, who dost govern all things in heaven and earth: Mercifully hear the supplications of thy people, and grant us thy peace all the days of our life; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Isaiah 49:1-7; Psalm 40:1-12; 1 Corinthians 1:1-9; John 1:29-42

The Old Testament lesson for today is provided by the second Servant Song from Isaiah. Its emphasis on the calling of the servant and his special vocation as a “light to the nations” makes it
especially appropriate in the season of Epiphany. The psalm is a prayer of thanksgiving which finally prompts the psalmist to tell abroad the good news of deliverance. The Epistle consists of the
opening greeting from Paul’s Letter to the Corinthians in which he gives thanks for the congregation and expresses confidence in the presence and saving, sanctifying power of God at work in the
ongoing life of the Church, which itself is an “ epiphany” or manifestation of God. The Gospel lesson today from John recalls the Baptism of Jesus which we celebrated last Sunday, and provides us with further theological content and reflection of the epiphany that took place there, and shows how it
was that others came “to see and believe.”


Prayer is doxology, praise, thanksgiving, confession, supplication and intercession to God. “When I prayed I was new,” wrote a great theologian of Christian antiquity, “but when I stopped praying I became old.” Prayer is the way to renewal and spiritual life. Prayer is aliveness to God. Prayer is strength, refreshment, and joy. Through the grace of God and our disciplined efforts prayer lifts us up from our isolation to a conscious, loving communion with God in which everything is experienced in a new light. Prayer becomes a personal dialogue with God, a spiritual breathing of the soul, a foretaste of the bliss of God’s kingdom.

As we pray deeply within our hearts we grow in prayer. By the grace of God we suddenly catch a glimpse of the miracle of the presence of the Holy Spirit working within us. At first it is only a spark but later it becomes a flame freeing and energizing our whole being. To experience the fire of God’s holy love, to give it space within us to do its cleansing and healing work as a breath of the Holy Spirit, and to use it as light and power for daily living — such are the goals as well as the fruits of true prayer.

The Fruits of True Prayer – Prayer & Spiritual Life – Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

January 12, 2020 – The Baptism of the Lord

O HEAVENLY Father, whose blessed Son Jesus Christ did take our nature upon him, and was baptized for our sakes in the river Jordan: Mercifully grant that we being regenerate, and made thy children by adoption and grace, may also be partakers of thy Holy Spirit; through him whom thou didst send to be our Saviour and Redeemer, even the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Isaiah 42:1-9; Psalm 29; Acts 10:34-43; Matthew 3:13-17

St. Mary’s Book Club

The theme chosen for the Book Club’s next gathering is “Sources of Delight.”  Readers are encouraged to share a book that brings them joy and laughter.  We will be meeting at 7:00 pm on Wednesday, January 15th in the lounge at the church.  All are welcome!